Chronic Illness Management and Cognitive Science: Translation Beyond Genes?

Saturday, February 19, 2011: 10:00 AM-11:30 AM
102B (Washington Convention Center )
Improving health outcomes and reducing the nationís health budget attributed to chronic illnesses (currently 70 percent) is a major issue for patients, medicine, and the economy. Efforts by experts in health policy and clinical medicine have focused on organizational factors, e.g., team-based approaches, for improving chronic illness management by patients and families. The current symposium focuses on improving chronic illness management by translating models of the processes underlying patientís self-management of chronic illness (Common-Sense Models of everyday behavior) to clinical practice and embedding these models in current approaches to management. These models describe how patients represent (perceive and understand) chronic conditions, their treatments, the action plans they create to implement disease management in their home environments, and how they evaluate treatment efficacy. We describe how patientís representations of asthma, hypertension, and diabetes affect adherence to prescribed treatments, and how their perceptions affect the use of medical care for life-threatening myocardial infarctions and chronic deterioration from congestive heart failure. Preliminary evidence is presented on the benefits of implementing these models in clinical practice, and we describe how recent evidence from cognitive neuroscience complements and supports a framework for modeling the everyday behaviors involved in the common-sense management of chronic illness.
Organizer:
Howard Leventhal, Rutgers University
Moderator:
Elaine A. Leventhal, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
Discussants:
Darlene Howard, Georgetown University
and Ethan A. Halm, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Speakers:
Ethan A. Halm, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Addressing Patients' Common-Sense Minds for Treatment Adherence in Chronic Illnesses
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